deep ecology, Events @ Listening Tree

Workshop: “The Work that Reconnects”

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Burnout. Turn off. News fast. Verge of despair.

We hear these words or themes so often these days. In the early days of the women’s march, creativity burgeoned, people who’d never taken to the streets got active, and fear motivated many to ramp up our efforts to protect Muslims, immigrants, people of color, LGBTQIA folk, the environment, in short, ourselves.

People thought it couldn’t get any more outrageous. But outrage was the thing. Otherwise, you weren’t paying attention.

Then the corollary: I can’t be more outraged, or outraged all the time, so I’m not going to pay attention. Syncing perfectly with the shock doctrine approach to burning out the populace, to misdirecting with misinformation and deflection. But we can see through that, and revive our work for justice and peace.

Jim and Karina of SpiralEcology and two of the co-founders of Listening Tree have been offering the Work that Reconnects workshops as an antidote for burnout, despair, numbness, and generalized hopelessness for six or so years now, and offer on this Saturday, 9:30-4:30 @ Listening Tree. More info here and here, and registration here or by calling (401)710-9784. Cost is $50 but scholarships available.

We’ll have a potluck afterward, around 5, with a tour of Listening Tree Cooperative. Anyone can come to one or both, just let us know. RSVP for the potluck only by calling (401)710-9784.

listening to the land, permaculture

Upcoming Events @ Listening Tree

For updates, see the Events @ Listening Tree page

permaculture promise

Listening Tree’s next potluck will be Saturday, June 17 at 4 pm. If you are interested in learning more about the co-op, please come! RSVP through the comments page, and leave us your phone number. Or call Listening Tree at 401-710-9784.

June 17 we also have a dowsing workshop with Steve Herbert, details here or below. It will be all day, and end with a free potluck to which the public is invited.

Then there will be a potluck July 1 at 4 pm.

July 15 we have an all-day permaculture design charette facilitated by Jono Neiger, author of The Permaculture Promise. Call or sign up for our email list to ensure you hear about details and registration. This event, too, will be followed by a open potluck at 4-4:30 pm. See below for details.

After that, the next potluck will be August 5. Harvest will be in full swing!

 

Basic Dowsing

An introduction to the practical art of accuracy in the search for location and information
A one-day intensive workshop in basic dowsing, tools, and methods
with Advanced Dowsing Instructor STEVE HERBERT
 

Saturday, June 17, 9:00AM – 4PM

Registration 8:30 • Rain or Shine

Listening Tree Coop

87 Reservoir Rd

Chepatchet, RI

Fee: $70.00

Includes lunch – Please bring your own mug, plate, and utensils.

 

Steve Herbert lives in St. Johnsbury, Vermont, and holds degrees in Geology and Anthropology. He has been an ASD member since 1985. He has also served in the Peace Corps in Africa and Latin America, where he has worked as an agro-forester, and in developing water resources and sanitation systems. Steve was named 2002 Dowser of the Year by the ASD.

We will cover

  • Introduction to dowsing
  • Dowsing tools and methods
  • Experiencing the dowsing reaction
  • Determining personal codes
  • Learning proper phrasing of requests
  • Applications of dowsing

The workshop will follow American Society of Dowsers founder and Master Dowser Terry Ross’s Seven Levels Of The Development Of The Dowser and offer advice for each stage of progression. Advanced topics will include dowsing theory, programming, increasing accuracy and the dowser’s sense. Guidance will be offered on all aspects of the dowsing quest or search. The focus will be on water dowsing as the topics are explained. A field demonstration and practice will be included. We will extend out to personal dowsing, earth energies, auras, agricultural dowsing, and other specialties as time permits.

Handouts provided. Dowsing tools will be available for practice and for sale.

For additional information, or to RSVP,

Please call 401-710-9784

or click on this link

 

Permaculture Design Charette


Some of us “cooperatives” have been living at Listening Tree for 2 years this June. We’ve dreamed, speculated, walked the land with “soft eyes,” started a lot of projects, planted a lot, but there’s so much more potential to cooperate with the ecosystem and heal the soil and biodiversity, as well as develop our community.

We’re thrilled Jono Neiger, author of The Permaculture Promise, will be coming to Listening Tree July 15 to lead an all-day permaculture design charette–an inclusive process of looking deeply into how to listen to and respond to the land, water, and life here, and plan our growth and integration.

More details here. Or go ahead and register for the $125 all-day event here.
Community life, deep ecology, transition

Glistening Trees

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The item on the top of the co-op’s winter to-do list was for the soil to sleep. Finally it can: 15 inches of snow Thursday (February 9) and another couple last night. I harvested a month’s worth of carrots just as the snow began, just in case, and because I could. We put up deer fence the day before because the ground was completely unfrozen, so we could.

I got a laugh out of a forester last week, when I said we wanted to tag some trees to cut before mud season. “It’s been mud season all winter!” he guffawed. True that. I meant March, but I’m still learning how to live according to nature-as-it-shows up vs. the Julian calendar. Add to that the vagaries of the Anthropocene and the shift is on.

With systems as unstable as these, it seems anything can happen.

-Karina

 

Community life, deep ecology, transition

Positive Thinking in a Dark Age

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Listening Tree Co-op cofounder Jim Tull has just published his book of essays, Positive Thinking in a Dark Age: Essays on the Global Transition.

deep ecology

Do Trees Listen?

IMG_3269Yes! That’s what scientists are now describing, as Suzanne Simard does in this Ted Talk. Trees converse “in the language of carbon…in the language of nitrogen,” and through mycellium intermediaries they send help to each other and their whole community.

“When mother trees are injured or dying, they also send messages–wisdom–onto the next generation of seedlings,” Simard says.

Tom Wessels summarizes the research: “Paper birch trees that were struggling in the forest received as much as 6 percent of their energy from carbohydrates produced by surrounding Douglas fir. The extra energy was fed to the struggling birch by the mycorrhizae [mutualistic fungi]…[T]he mycorrhizae benefited the entire forest ecosystem by maintaining or increasing photosynthetic rates, nutrient retention, and species richness.”

We are all so deeply interconnected! How much we have to learn if we just listen!

Here’s a poem about humans getting into the game.

listening to the land, permaculture

Snow finally comes

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The wetlands emerge!

After a week of actually working in the fields and woods as if it were spring, or fall, or some kind of dry mud season, snow finally came to Listening Tree. Everything is, of course, transformed. The vernal wetlands have appeared, confirming that those some different plant communities did indicate more water, and showing us where we might collect some more water for irrigation. The photo above is the vernal pond that feeds the dug irrigation/swimming/bass pond, while that pond itself is full again, as it was when we arrived in June. We can start to see what a year on this land will look like.

Here’s a panorama that shows that wetland and the year-round pond.

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listening to the land

New name!

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It took a good, long, collaborative while, but those of us living here have settled on a name. Listening Tree Cooperative. Or Lis’ning Tree Co-op for short.

While we were eating dinner out on the deck, the turkeys came by. Two mothers with seventeen adolescent turkeys have been roosting most nights in white pines close behind the house. They stage their awkward, flappy launches from our yard, one by one.

Wednesday morning I woke up early enough, and dawn broke late enough, that I heard for the first time the flock descend, again, one by one, to start their day. Now I’m listening every morning for their little gobbles and under-the-breath blurps and cackles and that I-can-fly-but-I’d-really-rather-not flapping.

I’m sure the trees have been listening all along.