Our first composting toilet installed!

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Let me just say the yuck factor for me is the opposite of the cultural norm. To me, the most disgusting thing that can happen in an ordinary day is splash back of toilet water on my butt. Seriously, is there an amount of toilet paper you can put down first that ensures no splash back and doesn’t clog the toilet? I spent 57 years trying to find the right balance. But those days are officially over at Listening Tree Coop!

plunger saying goodbye
Plunger looking for a new home

I know, I also went to camp and got latrine duty more than once. So I get it why people think it’s a lifestyle change for the worse to recycle the nutrients in your pee and poop for the good of the soil, the water, and humanity.

However, a compost toilet is not, I repeat not, an outhouse. The Full Circle design Ben Goldberg and Conor Lally just put in at Listening Tree Coop is a gem of appropriate technology. Like most indoor composting toilets, it has a 4W fan that ensures a negative pressure in the toilet, and pulls the odors out through a special plumbing stack. The Full Circle also uses elegant engineering to make the most of the knowledge gained by decades of design and maintenance of various models since the first composting toilet came on the scene in 1973. It simplifies maintenance through modular and interchangeable collection and resting units.

Ben, Conor, and Tony.JPG
Ben Goldberg (center) explains the compost toilet installation to apprentice Conor Lally (left) and plumber Tony Hawkes (right).

But before I get too techie, which you can do at BuildingGreen, I want to outline why it’s so important to move away from flush toilets. They pollute water. No way out of that. It takes tons of energy, chemicals, and work to pump and purify water to be drinkable. Then to use most of our household clean water to flush our toilets is just ecologically insane. Sewage treatment plants spend tons more energy, chemicals, and work to clean water. As we slide down Hubbert’s curve off peak oil, we can’t afford to waste energy like that. And the effluent from sewage treatment is still not completely clean, so we rely on ecosystems to do the rest of the work, which they can’t always handle. Septic systems are worse: many fail and pollute ground water and water bodies.¬† With the global water crisis increasing, we can’t afford to defile any more water, either, with insufficiently treated waste.

Which brings us to the most important piece. Flush toilets turn resources into waste. Poop and pee are actually resources, if handled the right way. We close the circle if we return them to soil as nutrients. Because urine is so high in nitrogen, peecyling avoids the need for natural gas-based fertilizers. To learn more about cutting edge research on peecycling for farming, check out the Rich Earth Institute. To see (and pee in) our compost toilet, come to our next potluck and/or farm workday, April 30. I promise, no splash backs.

Karina

you poop in it

2 thoughts on “Our first composting toilet installed!

  1. Hi Karina,

    That’s awesome! Were going to try and visit in the coming months. What your doing is really great.

    Thanks, Chris

    On Mon, Apr 11, 2016 at 1:38 PM, Listening Tree Coop wrote:

    > Karina Lutz posted: ” Let me just say the yuck factor for me is the > opposite of the cultural norm. To me, the most disgusting thing that can > happen in an ordinary day is splash back of toilet water on my butt. > Seriously, is there an amount of toilet paper you can put down fi” >

    Like

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